Best Rubaiyat Poem  “Rubaiyat Of Omar Khayyam , the author of this poem is  Edward Fitzgerald wrote that people should make the best use of time that  passes in this world.

Stanza 1:
Awake! (Not asleep) For Morning in the Bowel (the deepest inner parts) of Night
Has flung (throw) the Stone that put the Stars to Flight:
And Lo! The Hunter (a person or animal that hunts) of the East has caught
The Sultan’s Turret (a small tower) in a Noose of Light.

Reference to the Context:
These lines have been taken from the poet Gerald’s poem, “Rubaiyat Of Omar Khayyam”. The poet Edward Fitz Gerald’s wrote that one should make the best use of time that one passes in this world.

Explanation:
In this stanza the poet gives a call to others to get up from their sleep (not asleep). It is morning and the sun has come out. The stars have disappeared. The rays of the sun are falling on the tower of the king’s palace.

Paraphrase:
Get up from your sleep. Morning has thrown the stone into the cup of night. This has made the stars run away. See, the sun which rises in the east has come out. Its rays have caught the tower of Sultan’s palace in its grip.

Stanza 2:
The Worldly Hope men set their Hearts upon
Turns Ashes, or it prospers (make successful); and anon (soon; shortly),
Like Snow upon the Desert’s dusty (dull or muted) Face
Lighting a little Hour or two-is gone.

Reference to the Context:
These lines have been taken from the poet Gerald’s poem, “Rubaiyat Of Omar Khayyam”.  The poet Edward Fitz Gerald wrote that one should make the best use of time that one passes in this world.

Explanation:
In these lines the poet writes about the hope of success in the world which men have in their hearts soon proves to be useless. It soon comes to an end. Or it grows or develops and men think that it will be fulfilled. But very soon it is gone like “snow” in a desert, when the sun shines for an hour or two.

Paraphrase:
The worldly hopes (a feeling of trust) which human beings have in their hearts prove useless. It results into nothing. It is just like snow which has duration of an hour or two on the dirty face of desert and is gone.

Stanza 3:
There was a Door to which I found (discovered unexpectedly) no Key;
There was a Veil (conceal the face) past which I could not see:
Some little Talk a while of Me and Thee
There seem’d-and then no more of Thee and Me.

Reference to the Context:
These lines have been taken from the poet Gerald’s poem, “Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam”. The poet Edward Fitz Gerald wrote that one should make the best use of time that one passes in this world.

Explanation:
In these lines the poet writes about secrets and mystery of life. He saw a door to which he found no key to open with. There was a curtain. He could not see through this curtain. But he heard (be told or informed of) some talks(express ideas or feelings) about himself and other coming from the other side of the door. Soon the talk about them stops.

Paraphrase:
I saw a door there but I did not find its key. There was a curtain over this door through which I could not see the other side. I felt hearing a little talk about yourself and myself coming from the other side. But soon the talk stopped.

Stanza 4:
The moving Finger writes; and, having, writ,
Moves on; or all the piety nor Wit
Shall lure it back to cancel (neutralize or negate) half a Line,
Nor all thy (archaic or dialect form) Tears wash out (be excluded) a Word of it.

Reference to the Context:
These lines have been taken from the poet Gerald’s poem, “Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam”. The poet Edward Fitz Gerald wrote that one should make the best use of time that one passes in this world.

Explanation:
In these lines the poet says that the power of the world writes their fates in a final way. Once the fates of human beings are decided, they can never be changed. All the wisdom and piety (the quality of being religious) of human beings cannot be changed (make or become different) even a half line of what has been written. There is no way to wash a single word written by fate.

Paraphrase:
The finger that wrote the fate to man and having written the finger does not move. Our prayer or our intelligence cannot remove half a line of what has been written not our weeping can wash away one word out of it.

Stanza 5:
Yet Ah, that Spring should, vanish with the Rose!
That Youth’s sweet-scented (having a sweet, pleasant smell) manuscript should Close!
The Nightingale (a bird) that in the branches sang,
Ah whence, and whither flown again, who knows!

Reference to the Context:
These lines have been taken from the poet Gerald’s poem, “Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam”. The poet Edward Fitz Gerald’s wrote that one should make the best use of time that one passes in this world.

Explanation:
In these lines the poet that the spring season with its beautiful flowers like the rose comes to an end very soon. Youth with all its joy ends after a few years. The nightingale sings for some time on the branches of trees and then disappears. No one can say where it comes from and where goes. Life is useless. It means that everything in this world is temporary (not permanent) or short lived (short time).

Paraphrase:
It is really sad that the spring has disappeared with the disappearance (something ceasing to be visible) of the rose. In the same way, the period of youth comes to an end. The nightingale that sang in the branches of the trees has disappeared. No one knows where it has gone nor where it had come from.